“I’d never cried like that before, but the psalmist had”

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Today, I write at the Covenant Blog about how memorizing prayers has helped me deal with death.  Check it out HERE.

I’ve also written about how I’ve seen God through life with my grandpa over the last weeks and years.  Look HERE for an irregular Eucharist.  And HERE for what he’s learned from illness.

friendly village

Friendly Village

I’ve written about china before.

This was a part of my personality that didn’t come out till I left home and established my own nest, but it seems I inherited more than my mother’s penchant for period literature–I’m obsessed with dishware and love to throw a really good party, just like my mom does. Continue reading

Liturgy: It’s not the Work of the People

“I hope and pray that those charged with being custodians of the Church’s worship will do so in a way that honors the gifts and talents of their congregations.” Words on liturgy by the Rev. Canon Robert Hendrickson

A Desert Father

One of the more persistent phrases one hears in Episcopal Church circles is that the liturgy is “the work of the people” based on a translation of the Greek word Leitourgia.  This translation of the word often is then used as a way to say that the liturgy should be more “participatory” or involve more lay people in planning or more responsive to the desires of laity.  I would actually agree with all of these though I might quibble with what any of them actually means.

For example, if we say the liturgy should be more “participatory” this is often interpreted as meaning lay people say more or do more.  Yet in a culture in which we are constantly pressured to do and say the actually challenging act of participation may be to simply adore – to learn to be present with our hearts opened to God’s.

Liturgy+Sermon+Series+SlideYet, my…

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